Honoring those who have served

I am honored to be related to these men and women. Some gave their lives in service, some returned home to struggle with wounds acquired during service.  All were forever changed by their service. Thank you.

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Barclay Gibbs Jones (1925-1997)

American Revolution

  • Jonathan Buttles, Connecticut; Capt. in the 18th Regiment CT Militia
  • Cornelius Carhart, Major 2nd Hunterdon Regt. and Captain, 3rd Hunterdon Regt. New Jersey
  • Moses Cowdrey, Connecticut; Private in the Old Continental Army
  • George Emlen, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
  • Samuel Howell, (1722-1805), member of the Committee of Safety
  • Samuel Howell, (1748-1802), served as General Washington’s bodyguard and also as a private in the First Troop of cavalry
  • Samuel Leigh, Capt. John Hunt’s Co., 1st Regiment, Hunterdon Co., NJ militia
  • Richard Mount, Monmouth County, New Jersey
  • William Mount, private, Capt. Nixon’s Company of Horse
  • Isaac Roach, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States; commissioned by Benjamin Franklin
  • Hartman M Vreeland, New Jersey

War of 1812

  • Isaac Roach, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States; POW in Quebec, described by Henry Clay in speech on the new army bill in 1813 

Civil War

  • Samuel Foster Buttles was a member of the One Hundred and Forty-first Regiment, and received a gun-shot wound in the back, at the battle of Gettysburg, which finally caused his death in 1884.
  • Theron L.Cowdrey, 25th Regiment Connecticut Infantry, Co. E, served as a private
  • Charles J.Eastabrook, Pennsylvania; enlisted 28 May 1865, served as Com’s Sergt of 141st Pennsylvania Volunteers, wounded
  • Erasmus Percival Hine, Bradford, Pennsylvania. Served in 141 Regiment Co. D Pennsylvania Volunteers
  • Benjamin Jones, Private, Co. C, 10 New Jersey Volunteers
  • Benjamin Walter Jones, Civil War Union Army Officer. He served in the Civil War as Captain and commander of Company I, 1st New Jersey Volunteer Cavalry, being mustered in on August 29, 1861. On September 20, 1862, he was discharged due to disability.
  • Ivins Davis Jones, Became a Captain of Company C of the First New Jersey Volunteer Infantry and later as a Major in the 1st NJ Vol. Cavalry. Also enlisted in 1st Potomac Home Brigade Cavalry Cole’s Brigade, Co M
  • Anthony Jones Morris, Private, 1st Battalion, New Jersey Volunteers
  • Hiram Mount, New Jersey, United States; commissioned 1st lieutenant Co. C, 29th NJ Volunteers and mustered out in 1863
  • George Mortimer Prince, enrolled in Co. G, 5th regiment of NY Cavalry, medical discharge
  • James L.Prince, drafted at age 25 on Sept. 26, 1864, for 1 yr.; and mustered at Troy, Pennsylvania. He was assigned to Company A, 97th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry and was discharged by General Order on June 28, 1865. dis. June 28, ’65.
  • Stephen Vreeland Van Ripen, enlisted in the 126th New York Infantry Co. J, taken prisoner at battle Sep 1862, paroled and discharged on medical disability.
  • John Vought, served in Company B of the 76th Pennsylvania Infantry
  • Nicholas D. Vreeland, served in the NJ Infantry, 22nd Regiment, Co. A

Spanish American War

  • George V Buttles, Spanish American War, Company M

Mexican Expedition

  • Harold Doremus Tompkins

World War I

  • Oscar Ayres
  • Francis Mumford Gibbs
  • William S.Hancock
  • Walter B.Holton
  • Elizabeth Brightly Jones
  • Clarence Kinsley
  • Harold A.Leigh
  • George Dewey Lewis
  • Milton Pierson Lewis, WWI veteran – cpl US Army Co H 114th Infantry 29 Division
  • Samuel Lewis
  • Robert Martin, Served in the Navy during WWI, quartermaster
  • Burns Wilson Mount joined Ohio National Co F 3rd Infantry, Co F 166 AEF
  • George Raymond Prince, served in the Navy
  • Philip Hine Prince, registered as a Pvt. in the Engineers, 2 Jun 1918, assigned to Co. B, 548th Engineers, promoted to sergeant 1 Oct. 1918, released 29 Jul 1919
  • Harold E Stackhouse, Mercer County, New Jersey
  • William Johnson Taylor
  • Henry Wolcott Toll
  • Harold Doremus Tompkins, served in the signal corps of the New Jersey National Guard in France; served as a lieutenant with the American Expeditionary Forces
  • Carl W. Vietor, Served in the Motor Transport Corps
  • Harold Van Pelt Vreeland, Served in the Medical Corps, July 1, 1918 to April 1919
  • Horace Wills, Lieutenant

World War II

  • Stanley Bernard Bean, Fort Dix, Burlington, New Jersey, United States
  • Quentin Clayton
  • Drayton Cochran served from July 1941 to March 1946 in the Atlantic Theatre; commanding officer of USS PC-486 in the invasion of Amchitka, and commanding officer of USS Keith (DE-241) and USS Robert I. Paine (DE-578) in the Atlantic. He left the service as a lieutenant commander.
  • Earl Goodman, Navy 1943-1946
  • Barclay Gibbs Jones, drafted and served in Company E 379th Infantry 95th Division, POW
  • Elwood Oscar Jones, served aboard the USS Essex; served in the Navy
  • Clarence Paul Kinsley, battle medic
  • Wilbur Sherman served in Europe
  • Robert Stanton, served in the South Pacific; flight engineer flew with the Navy
  • William Dorus Stubenbord, served in the Navy’s Medical Corps, retiring as a captain
  • Gertrude Vreeland Tompkins, WASP, died in service

Korean War

  • Samuel Emlen Howell Jones

General Service

  • Myron Percival Brown, Corporal, United States Air Service
  • Barclay G. Jones IV

 

Alma Gage and the Gage connection

The Gage connection is through the Buttles line and the generation is three “greats” back. I have a lot of photographs of this generation, cabinet card and carte de visite photographs that were apparently shared with family like trading cards. Sometimes the annotations on the back lead to clues about marriages and other name changes. Sometimes they just leave me wondering.

My three times great grandmother Elizabeth Alma Buttles shared part of her name with her niece by her brother Harlow J. Buttles,  Alma Dolly Buttles was born 18 March 1866, most likely in Bradford County.  She married Charles H. Gage on 6 September 1893. He listed his occupation at the time of his marriage as farmer but I found evidence through newspaper notices that he and Alma may have moved down to Camden for a short period around 1900.  By 1905 the family is living in Broome County, NY, a stone’s throw away from Bradford County, PA. Charles and Alma Gage had three children but only one grew to adulthood: Harriet Gage (1894), Mary Eugenia Gage (1896-1941) and Karl Gage (1899-1900).

This photograph intrigues me for many reasons: who is Mary Fisher, who took the photograph and what are they sitting on?

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Adventure comes in many forms

This week in #52ancestors the theme is Adventure and I decided to write about the farthest flung family on my tree: the Negus family.  The Negus line hangs off the Van Syckel line in Hunterdon County, New Jersey as one of Aaron Van Syckel’s grandchildren (by Daniel (1790-1861)) Isabella Van Syckel married James Engle Negus of Philadelphia.

Negus_James_Engle_theft_Arkansas_Washington_Telegraph_Wed__Jun_21__1854_James Engle Negus (1809-1884) starts out in Philadelphia where he is a wealthy merchant and chief weight clerk at the U. S. Mint in Philadelphia. However, in June of 1854, Negus is exposed for short weighting gold at the Mint. He made immediate restitution (for tens of thousands of dollars, if the newspapers are to be believed) and flees with his family to England. He later returns to the US and settles with his mother Susan, his wife Isabella and daughter Susan Engle in Somerset County, New Jersey where he owned a great deal of farmland. This may explain why I cannot find the family in the 1860 Census, and then find them in Franklin township, Somerset, NJ in 1870. James apparently saw the error of his ways, as he becomes a successful gentleman farmer in Franklin. His mother dies there, as do Isabella and Susan.

James Engle Negus and Isabella Van Syckel Negus have four children: Robert Patterson Negus (1838-1884), Susan Engle Negus (1840-1915), James Engle Negus (1842-1903) and William Shippen Negus (1844-1914).  William S. Negus appears to have been in finance. James E. Negus served with distinction in the Civil War and settled in Greenville, Mississippi where he was a banker. Susan Engle Negus never married but was active in many women’s organizations including the DAR. Robert Patterson Negus is the traveler and the one who caught my eye when the topic of adventure came up.

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A group of Masons in front of the Oxford Hotel, Sydney, Australia. Robert P. Negus is in front with his right hand over his heart.

Robert Patterson Negus (1838-1884) was born and raised in Philadelphia. I have seen mention of his education in Europe as an engineer. He may have gotten the travel bug as the family flitted about England and Wales. He was in New Zealand in 1863 when he married Mary Ann Hargrave (1838-1881), daughter of Captain William Hargrave of Sandridge. They had seven children:

  • Mary Ann Isabella Negus (1864-1950) married David James Bardwell Smith
  • Susan Engle Emiline Negus (1866)
  • Charlotte Ernestine Negus (1868-1949) married Edward V. French
  • William James Hargrave Negus (1871) 
  • Selinda Parry Negus (1872-1959) married twice
  • Horatio Van Syckel Negus (1874-1966)
  • Virginia Louise Negus (1876-1956)

However, neither Robert nor Mary Ann Negus would live to see their 45th birthday. Mary Ann died in 1881 and Robert died 2 October 1884. This tragedy meant that four of the seven children needed a new home. Mary Ann Isabella Negus, while the eldest, could not take on the raising of her siblings. She married shortly after her father’s death, and was possibly courting David Smith when all this was going on. Courtship of a young woman is one thing, taking on a ready made family quite another. In any case, the four younger siblings are sent back to America to live with their grandmother Isabella VS Negus and aunt Susan Engle Negus.

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Interesting side note: the guardianship proceedings distinguish between Charlotte who is over 14 and the three children under 14. Each is noted as having about $500 to their name. James Engle Negus seems to have helped manage some of these proceedings but by my reckoning he is settled in Mississippi at this time with a wife and three children. However, William Shippen Negus appears to have settled in Bound Brook and so he may also have been involved in retrieving the children. Possibly their adventure was travelling by steamer across the world without an adult!

This line represents a fascinating side trip and I want to thank cousin Melanie Ealey for bringing it to my attention. Her email to me was exactly what I was hoping would happen when I started this blog!

The Elliott family connection

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Helen Elliott (1902-1962)

I haven’t posted any photographs recently, so here goes! This weeks’ #52ancestors #52familyphotographs brings a breakthrough on the Wells family line. My great grandmother was a Wells from Burlington County, New Jersey.  However, her father’s sister Mary married a Lippincott and they settled in Cumberland County.

I had not ever been able to make the connection between the Mamie who wrote notes on the backs of these adorable postcards and my tree. Today I decided to conquer this line of the Wells family and low and behold, Henry and Mary Wells Lippincott had two daughters, Mamie and Abbie.

Mamie (or Margaret, she went as both) married Harry Bishop Elliott in 1901 and they had two children: Helen Elliott (1902-1962) and Walter Scott Elliott (1914-1999). I hope the Elliott family descendants find these images as interesting as I did. I love the look on Walter’s face, as I have similar pictures of my father with that “butter would not melt in his mouth” look.

 

Samuel and Sarah Lewis

This is going to be one of those “grrrr” blogs where I don’t have the answers I want but I am going to write the essay anyway.  I may never have all the information. But I am tired of waiting for the big genealogy balloon to drop.

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John Herr

I have this photograph of a man identified as John Herr. I have my father’s genealogy notes identifying him as the grandfather of Florence Lewis. Here is what I can piece together from other, incomplete resources:

Florence Lewis was the oldest child of Samuel Lewis and Sarah Herr.  She married Moses Wells and that story I have got a pretty good handle on.  Going back in time is the problem. Samuel Lewis appears with Sarah his wife from 1860 to 1885 in various state and federal censuses. As do their six children:

  • Florence Lewis (1859-1947) married Moses Wells
  • Pierce (Pierson) Lewis (1862-1926) married Clara Lamb
  • Josephine Lewis (1864-1936) married Harry Goodman
  • Ellsworth Lewis (1867-1890) married Keziah Platt
  • Colby Lewis (1869-1939) married Elsie Jackson
  • Clara Lewis (1875-1946) married William Marshall

I wonder: When did Samuel and Sarah get married? Was it a first marriage for both? Either? If Samuel is living next to John and Mary Herr (spelled Heers in the 1850 Census), why is his wife named Mary?  Is this the Samuel Lewis and Mary McKelvey who got married in 1842? Did she die and he remarried? Or is this actually Samuel and Sarah (name written WAY wrong) and they just waited 17 years to have their first child? And where does the family lore about the Herr’s potato chip fortune come into it? Wishful thinking? Or mixed up identities as there is a John Herr married to a Mary Ann out in Westmoreland County, PA. I’m pretty sure that’s not the same person.  But every family tree online seems sure that this is the case.

Eleonore Heike

I am learning that amazing connections come from #52ancestors and putting my stories out there online so that people can add to them.  Enter my newest discovery: Eleonore Heike’s wedding date and picture.  I can’t thank my cousins enough for sharing these treasures with me!

Eleonore Heike married James Haviland Tompkins on 3 June 1909!

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And here she is in her beautiful wedding dress!

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Eleonore Heike Tompkins Photo courtesy of Grace E. Poland Knight

Rebecca Clevenger Jones

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Stella Mae and Rebecca C. Jones

Rebecca Clevenger Jones was born in Pemberton on 2 April 1883. She and her sister Mary (Stella Mae) were the two youngest girls at home with their parents at the time of Benjamin’s death in 1896.

On 10 July 1907 she married Leroy “Roy” Rue in the Methodist Episcopal parsonage in Mt. Holly. Roy was from East Windsor, NJ and worked for the railroad most of his life, dying in 1941. Roy and Reba had four children: Kenneth Leroy Rue (1908-1980) Mae Ayres Rue (1909) Arthur Jones Rue (1910-1978) Evelyn Mae Rue (1914-2003).

The three living children were baptized at the First Methodist Church in Mount Holly, and in 1919 both Rebecca and Kenneth became members. They may not have been very active as further mention does not surface.

Although the young couple appears to have lived in East Windsor early in their marriage, by 1920 they are back in Burlington County, living in Hainesport.  After Roy’s death in 1941, Reba may have moved around. She died in 1963 and is buried with Roy in the Mount Holly Cemetery.